Skip to Main Content
Mobile Menu

News and Opinion

A roundup of news articles, journal articles, essays, opinion pieces, and other items of interest about accessibility and universal design for learning.

Improving Accessibility Often Falls to Faculty. Here’s What They Can Do. | EdSurge News

Like many of her peers, Ann Wai-Yee Kwong struggled in statistics while working towards a bachelor’s degree in psychology at UC Berkeley. But because she is legally blind, she had an added challenge of not being able to see the diagrams and notes projected in the lecture hall or assigned for homework.

Tools like screen readers could ease this issue for Kwong, who is now a Ph.D. student at the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California Santa Barbara. But a common problem prevented that: some faculty have been slow to catch up with technological advances, and many wait until students ask for accommodations rather than having accessible materials from the start.

“I think the onus is still placed on the student with a disability” to ensure they have learning materials that they can benefit and learn from, says Kwong. “You have to advocate for yourself.”

Read more: Improving Accessibility Often Falls to Faculty. Here’s What They Can Do. | EdSurge News

Transcription and Accessibility—New Partnerships from Microsoft and Amazon | EdSurge News

On the heels of one another, two tech titans recently announced higher-education partnerships that leverage transcription technology to make educational materials more accessible to a broader swath of learners.

On April 5, Microsoft announced a partnership with the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. Via Microsoft Translator, a translation service, students in classes and lectures can get automated transcriptions on their mobile and desktop devices. Professors can also choose to show the transcriptions on a big screen behind them. The partnership’s primary aim is to support students who are deaf and hard of hearing. . . . Amazon followed with an announcement of its own on Monday. The e-commerce giant announced that Amazon Transcribe, a service that converts audio from speech to text is partnering with Echo360, a video-platform for higher education institutions, to provide automated captioning of lectures that will be displayed side-by-side along the video. Students will be able to download the transcripts and reference them later.

Read more: Transcription and Accessibility—New Partnerships from Microsoft and Amazon | EdSurge News

A Civil Rights Activist Filed Thousands of Disability Complaints. Now the Education Department Is Trying to Shut Her Down | The 74

Marcie Lipsitt used to enjoy checking the mail. But these days, not so much.Over the course of several years, the disability rights activist has filed thousands of federal civil rights complaints against school districts and universities across the country — all part of a personal crusade to make websites accessible for people with disabilities.

Lipsitt said state education departments, prestigious universities, and large school districts — even specialty schools geared toward students who are blind or deaf — often provide sprawling websites that fail to comply with federal accessibility laws. Filing civil rights complaints en masse, she found, was an efficient tool to improve web access for people with disabilities, including those who are blind or deaf or have fine motor impairments.

As a result of her complaints, her mailbox was routinely flooded with letters from the Education Department, and often, she was pleased with what she found inside.

Each month, the 58-year-old said, the department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) would open as many as 150 new investigations based on her complaints. Simultaneously, she received as many as 100 letters a month notifying her that an institution had signed a resolution agreement to fix the problem.

But in 2018, things are looking bleak for Marcie Lipsitt.

Read more: A Civil Rights Activist Filed Thousands of Disability Complaints. Now the Education Department Is Trying to Shut Her Down | The 74

How Technology Can Equalize Learning Differences – The Chronicle of Higher Education

For a moment, let’s put aside the debate over whether laptops are a distraction in the classroom.

Disregard the Twitter threads and op-eds alternately calling for a ban on such electronic devices or a ban on banning devices. Let’s instead recognize that the debate over whether laptops belong in the classroom — or even technology writ large — misses the fundamental issue.

The heart of the issue is not whether technology is a distraction in the classroom. It’s that different students learn differently. We should be discussing how to organize our teaching to engage diverse learning styles. And yes, some of those strategies involve the use of technology. There is a great need for professors to be both pedagogically trained to support learning differences in the classroom and to understand the changing landscape of learning accommodations.

Read more: How Technology Can Equalize Learning Differences – The Chronicle of Higher Education

When Accessibility Doesn’t Make It into the EDUCAUSE Top 10: Turn It Up to 11 | EDUCAUSE

As national-level conversations continue to take shape around supporting accessibility and sharing resources, community colleges must be included: the issues are too critical to us and to the populations we serve to not have our voices heard.

Read more: When Accessibility Doesn’t Make It into the EDUCAUSE Top 10: Turn It Up to 11 | EDUCAUSE

When It Comes to Universal Design for Learning, Don’t Wait to Be an Expert – Education Week Teacher

Most teachers will agree that student brains are as diverse as their fingerprints. Each student is compelled by different interests, aided by different strengths, and hindered by different struggles. Universal design for learning, or UDL, provides a framework for embracing the neurodiversity that exists in all our classrooms. It asks teachers to create flexible learning environments and practices to support a broad range of learners. It might seem like you have to be an expert to start employing UDL principles in the classroom—but in fact, you can start laying the groundwork as early as tomorrow.

Read more: When It Comes to Universal Design for Learning, Don’t Wait to Be an Expert – Education Week Teacher

Author discusses his new book on disability and higher education

Academic Ableism (University of Michigan Press) notes the progress higher education has made to be more inclusive of people with disabilities than in the past. But the book isn’t full of praise. Rather, it offers critique after critique of the way colleges have ignored or responded inadequately to the needs of many students and professors.

The author is Jay Timothy Dolmage, associate professor of English at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, who takes disability issues seriously. Below the signature line on his emails is this phrase: “If you have an accommodation need for a planned meeting, please email me directly and I will do my best to make appropriate arrangements. Should you require any materials sent via this email address in an alternate/accessible format, please let me know.”

Via email, he responded to questions about his new book.

Read more: Author discusses his new book on disability and higher education

Tuning your Pedagogical Practices: Building a Universal Teaching Environment | GradHacker

Graduate student instructors sometimes operate under a lot of external constraints, because they do not have much control over the curriculum they are being asked to teach. That can make receiving an accommodation notification from a student rather fraught. Teaching Basic Writing, a reading and writing intensive course in Fall 2016, brought me a lot of clarity on these limitations, and it started on Day 1: I found my student, “Cam,” pacing the hallway outside our class.

An athlete whose sport was in season during the fall, Cam told me, “Maybe it would be best if I took this class at another time. It sounds like a lot of work.” I agreed that it would be a lot of work and I encouraged him to stick with the class and me as the instructor. During our conversation, Cam revealed that he never thought of himself as a strong writer and that reading was an even bigger challenge. Connecting to his experience as an athlete, I offered, “Yes, we do a lot of writing and reading in this course; but, just like you prepare for game day with scrimmages and gym workouts, we build up to writing a 1,000 word essay by doing small tasks that exercise and develop your writing skills.” Ultimately, the decision was his and I’m happy to report that not only did Cam stay in the class, he excelled as a writer. What he did not tell me at this time, but I learned later through an official notification from our campus’s Disability Services office, was that he needed a significant amount of accommodations.

According to Cam, the most important accommodation (of the ones identified by campus disability services) was being able to access course texts in optical character recognition (OCR) PDFs; this would allow him to use audio assistive technology in addition to extra time for assignments. Because most of our readings were no more than fives pages and were available online, this required very little of me as an instructor. What it also brought up was an ongoing issue I had with the cost of books my students were required to purchase when nearly all of the readings were available freely online.

More forcefully than in any other single class, I realized the importance of universal design for learning (UDL). This curricular design features multiple access points for learning, engagement, and assessment. As Dr. Jennifer Stone puts it, “designing on the front end” with UDL minimizes the need for individual learners to make a special request.

Read more: Tuning your Pedagogical Practices: Building a Universal Teaching Environment | GradHacker

Igniting a Universal Design Mindset on Campus | EDUCAUSE

In higher education, discussions around accessibility often start with federal mandates and accommodations. This framing tends to cultivate a campus culture focused on accommodations, but “. . . accommodation is a reactive approach to provide access to an individual . . . [whereas] Universal Design processes are proactive approaches to ensure access for groups of potential participants.”

At Dartmouth, we realized that this distinction creates an opportunity for changes in both teaching and learning. While some legal requirements for accessibility are not necessarily met through the practice of universal design, we hope to guide our institution toward a culture aimed at designing for the widest possible set of student needs.

Read more: Igniting a Universal Design Mindset on Campus | EDUCAUSE

With life-changing condition, Williamsburg native looks to technology for sight | Williamsburg Yorktown Daily

Veronica Lewis was three years old when she was diagnosed with a life-changing condition.

Chiari Malformation is a structural defect of the skull and the brain. In Lewis’s case, it contributed to her poor eyesight. Now, 17 years after her initial diagnosis of vision impairment, Lewis is studying information technology at George Mason University with the dream of making technology more accessible to the disabled.

Her goal inspired the Redmond, Washington-based technology giant Microsoft to create a video featuring Lewis about assistive technology and their products.“

Technology doesn’t just make things easier, it makes things possible,” Lewis, a long-time Williamsburg resident, said.

Read more: With life-changing condition, Williamsburg native looks to technology for sight | Williamsburg Yorktown Daily